52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, Week 19: Jacques Campeau

Click HERE for last week’s ancestor.

My next two ancestors share a common theme: they helped settle and develop a major city in the USA – Detroit. They were among the very first settlers to the area.

Jacques Campeau was born in May 1677 at Montreal, son of French immigrant and mason Etienne Campeau, Campau or Campo and Catherine Paulo or Polo. He was baptized at the church of Notre Dame de Montreal on May 31, 1677. He married Jeanne Cecile Catin on November 30, 1699 at Montreal, and shortly after in 1703-1704 with the Compagnie de la Colonie he travelled to the area that would become known as Detroit and Fort Pontchartrain.

In 1708 he brought the rest of his family to Detroit on the invitation of Antoine de le Mothe Cadillac, the commandant of Fort Pontchartrain who was looking to settle a colony there. His older brother Michel, who is also my ancestor had also brought his family in 1707. Jacques was a blacksmith and in addition participated in trading, mostly of furs. He and Cecile had 8 children in total.

In 1734 he was granted a piece of land 4 by 40 arpents just east of Fort Pontchartrain and he started a merchant store, buying and selling goods such as furs, corn, wheat, etc. He became ill in 1750 and passed away 8 May 1751. He is buried in Detroit’s Mount Elliott Cemetery.

An interesting point on Jacques, is like many other Detroit area residents of French background, he also began to be known by a more anglicized version of his name – James – as did his wife “Cecilia”.

Document: The marriage of Danylo Koszlak and Anna Bruchanska

After some postal difficulties, I received the marriage certificate of my great great grandparents Danylo Koszlak and Anna Bruchanska from the Manitoba Vital Statistics Agency. So, voila:

The penmanship is somewhat difficult to read, but here’s my transcription:

Registration Division of: Beausejour Brokenhead
1. Name of GROOM (surname first): Surname: Koschlak; Given name: Danyto Danylo
2. Rank or profession: farmer
3. Bachelor, widower or divorced: bachelor
4. Age: 23
5. Religious denomination: gr. cat
6. Usual residence: Brokenhead T. 14, R.8, m.29
7. Name and surname of father: Prokop Koschlak
8. Rank or profession of father: farmer
9. Name and maiden name of mother: Chrystina Fink
10. Name of BRIDE (surname first): Surname: Bruchanska, Given name: Anna
11. Rank or profession: farmer
12. Spinster, widower or divorced: spinster
13. Age: 19
14. Religious denomination: gr. cat
15. Usual residence: Brokenhead
16. Name and surname of father: Dmytro Bruchanski
17. Rank or profession of father: farmer
18. Name and surname of mother: Nastia Rozdobudko
19. When married: 10th day of February, 1914
20. Where married: Brokenhead Church of the Holy Ghost
21. How married (license or banns; if by license, give number): Banns
22. Names and addresses of witnesses: Name: Nykola Rostlinkski; Address: Brokenhead T.14, R.7, m.13; Name: Michal Wialogowski; Address: Brokenhead, T.14, R.8, m.31
23. Signature, address and religious denomination of person solemnizing marriage: The above-stated particulars are true to the best of my knowledge and belief. Signature of officiating clergyman: Rev. Eaudraibuim (sp?); Address: Beausejour; Religious denomination: gr. cat
24. Registered number: 14. Filed at this office this: 5th 3 4th day of Feb March, 1914

This also further confirms that Danylo and Mary Faduck were siblings, since their parental information is the same on this marriage certificate and Mary’s death certificate.

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, Week 16: Prokop Koszlak

Click HERE for last week’s ancestor.

Prokop Koszlak was born around the year 1865 near the village of Novosilka in Pidhaitsi raion (region), Ternopil oblast (province) in modern day Ukraine. He is my 3x great grandfather, the father of  Danylo Koszlak. I have absolutely no documents pertaining to him other than 3 of his children’s marriage certificates from here in North America that list his name as their father. He was a farmer, and he married a woman named Kristina Fink. At least 3 of his children (possibly more) immigrated to North America in the early 1900’s, as did a large number of residents of the area. It was one of the poorest regions in Europe at the time, and the mass exodus of natives left to carve out a better life for their future generations.

I feel like my Ukrainian branch of family tree are the most exotic, to me anyways, and I was not expecting many records to be available. But happily I was wrong, there are church records and state held records available.

Roadblock number one in pushing my Ukrainian research back further: because my father was adopted, I don’t have birth certificates and hard evidence – documents directly connecting me to Prokop, and this is necessary for some research. However I have been told that because the records I am looking for – Prokop’s birth/marriage/death/other children – are more than 100 years old, it is possible the state archives, known as the RAHS would grant me a privacy release. Roadblock numbers two is a language barrier. I have overcome language barriers before, but the mix of Ukrainian/Polish/Russian in Cyrillic alphabet is proving to be a challenge for me, and I have to admit I have been putting it off.

There are two ways for me to get my hands on more information: Metrical (church) records, held by the LDS church that can be ordered on microfilm for viewing, and records held by the RAHS. The metrical records are from 1864 and earlier, which is a problem because I can’t be sure Prokop was born earlier than 1865, it’s possible his baptism is not included here. PLUS language barrier. As for the records held by the RAHS, and I believe this is the route I will pursue soon, there is the issue of language barrier again, I would have to compose a letter that the archivists can read, which should surely be in Ukrainian, thought there is a small chance someone will speak English there. There could also be fees involved in foreign currency, and up until now I have been a neglectful Ukrainian genealogist because it has just seemed too difficult! However, writing this post has got me going again in this direction, and I believe I will attempt to contact the archives soon, if I can find help!